Summary

Prometheus: The Complete Fire and Stone is an epic that brings the Alien vs Predator universe in a crossover event that plays out like a proper sequel to Prometheus. Beating out Alien Covenant anyway.

REVIEW OVERVIEW

Writing
Pencils/Inking
Colors
Lettering
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PROMETHEUS: THE COMPLETE FIRE AND STONE – What The Movies Should Be

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Prometheus: The Complete Fire and Stone is the big crossover event of Dark Horse’ Aliens vs. Predator universe. After the divisive introductions of the Prometheus movie, this series brings together different creative teams about an epic of obsession. With Ridley Scott’s films failing to meet expectations, Fire and Stone reuses the premise to do the concept justice.

Overall Story of Prometheus: Fire and Stone

Prometheus: Fire and Stone begins its epic with a salvage crew on the setting of the original movie, LV-223. The captain, Angela Hope, keeps from the crew that she intends to discover the events of the film. Coming off of YouTube Channel Wisecrack’s interpretation of Prometheus, however, such obsessions lead to disappointments. Yet that’s putting it mildly. As it turns out, a lot of people, including survivors from Aliens, also set up shop less than a century ago. And their lives turn for the worse as the actions of these people lead to the current cast’s predicaments. Just about everybody keeps crucial details (like Angela’s quest) to themselves, which leads to disastrous consequences. Most of which end up with people under attack by Xenomorphs.

The Flow of Themes

This cyclical nature outlines the themes of the respective franchise: from Prometheus come obsessions, leading to the brutal nature of Aliens, finishing with the need to overcome this brutality in Predator. Paul Tobin begins the series with how Captain Angela Foster’s obsession with learning the events of Prometheus leads her crew into danger. Chris Roberson meanwhile creates a prequel on Fire and Stone’s setting. One that sets up the conflict of the present by demonstrating how one character’s obsession melds with the setting.

All of which leads to the Predators as they clash with the Xenomorphs in Christopher Sebela’s story. Between all of the philosophical monologues by mutating cyborg Eldan, he pushes the climax of the series where the characters question their obsessions. The main Predator even gets the name Ahab in Joshua Williamson’s Predator run, referencing the conflict of Moby Dick. These obsessions could kill the rest of the cast despite becoming aware of their actions. All before going full circle with the Omega issue by Kelly Sue DeConnick, where the cast makes peace with their decisions, no longer burdened by their obsessions.

Artwork

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The Prometheus Fire and Stone epic features many of the pencilers serve as inkers as well. This method allows for a myriad of detail. Juan Ferreyra in the Prometheus section, shows a photorealistic depiction almost looking like this is from the movie this series gets its title from. Patric Reynolds displays a more eerie style in the Aliens section with his depiction of the mountain base setting evoking feelings from the classic H.P. Lovecraft story At The Mountains of Madness. Ariel Olivetti employs more grotesque imagery in addition to the sleek details of the ship Alien vs. Predator takes place on. The fact Olivetti does the coloring with an airbrush shows the amount of detail into just Elden.

Chris Mooneyham’s art has a much rougher detail to display in Predator; the additional shading by John Lucas almost acts as an indicator of something hiding in the shadows to strike. Agustin Alessio finishes Prometheus Fire and Stone’s Omega issue with the photorealistic art, the grotesque imagery, the eerie, claustrophobic atmosphere while ditching rougher sides. Because with an ending about making peace even in the darkest place, who cares about potential actions?

Coloring

The above art styles are further accented by the numerous colorists. It is unknown how much of the coloring in Prometheus Fire and Stone is by Juan. By issue 2 onward, some of the tasks are shared with his brother Eduardo Ferreyra. Yet the cooperation between them goes into the depths of detail surrounding such a complex story. Especially with its equally vibrant setting. Aliens in the meantime gets its coloring by Dave Stewart, which between all of the shading highlights what it brings to all the other installments. This includes the cave notes in the mountain camp that the Prometheus cast likes to use as a reference. Dan Brown does something a little similar in Predator by highlighting the bright backgrounds against the darkened settings.

The rest of the series have their coloring by the penciler/inkers. The dedication these artists go to provide such detailed and elaborate artwork over the span of a few months is worthy of high praise. It’s practically comparable to the work of the late Frank Frazetta in his work with Conan the Barbarian. Each layer from the pencils, the inks, to color upon colors creates a fully realized image.

Lettering by Nate Piekos

The one constant throughout Prometheus The Complete Fire and Stone is Nate Piekos, the letterer. His presence and lettering ensure the reader that this entire epic stays connected. From the moment the Prometheus crew steps out the word balloons waste no time in displaying the scenery. Keeping dialog to a minimum allows for the really tense moments to move uninterrupted. For the bigger panels he has captions slow the reader down enough to fully embrace the artwork. If that’s not enough his ability to depict alien languages matches only with how he communicates with the creative teams. Because without their input, the Predator dialog would either be too short or too long to keep the reader focused.

Prometheus The Complete Fire and Stone is Epic

If Prometheus The Complete Fire and Stone was a movie, it would be the sequel that Alien Covenant failed to be. Continuing its themes of obsessive curiosities and its destructive aftermath, this entire event series does that theme justice. All by encompassing every thematic element from the franchises it shares a universe with. None of this would even be possible without the creative teams bouncing off each other the way they do. Unlike the movie studios’ getting in the way of what could be a great flick. It’s the communication between parties that make this series stand out.

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Jake Palermohttps://gutternaut.net/
Greeting panel readers, My name is Jake but I never replace anyone or anything; I merely follow and fill in the gaps. I write stories and articles that help people piece together anything that helps them understand subjects like culture, the people who write their favorite stories, and how it affects other people.