reflection

Marvel Action: Spider-Man #1 is a fun and light read, one that is delightfully full of foreshadowing and adventure. The artwork and character reactions in this issue are bright and charming, making it perfect for fans of all ages to dive into.
Writing/Story
Pencils/Inks
Coloring
Lettering

The Trials of School In MARVEL ACTION: SPIDER-MAN #1

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IDW’s MARVEL ACTION: SPIDER-MAN #1, available March 31st, is about to throw Peter Parker back into school – his favorite years. Sarah Graley, Stef Purenins, Philip Murphy, Maria Keane, Ronda Pattison, and Shawn Lee are at the helm of this latest Spider-Man attraction.

Marvel Action: Spider-Man #1 is the start of the third series of its kind. Once again, Peter Parker is the focus. His origin has been set, but his time in school is not complete. That makes this series pretty approachable for all audiences, knowing full well what sort of messes he’ll get up to in the meantime.

It’s worth mentioning that the school Peter is attending is…not a standard one. He’s heading to Oscorp Charter School, and fans that know his history well can probably safely start guessing what exactly is going on inside that building.

One small change is the perfect setup to lots of surprises, new plots, and interesting twists. Making this a fun Spider-Man adventure for all.

The Writing

Written by Sarah Graley and Stef Purenins, Marvel Action: Spider-Man #1 is a blast to read. It’s a lighter version of the sometimes overly heavy series many fans are familiar with. Yet there’s no doubt that mischief is just around the corner.

Sometimes literally, as the case may be. This series is already doing a solid job of showcasing the work/life balance that Peter just never seems to get a grip on. The struggle is real, especially in this series. The inclusion of his school (and the implications surrounding the faculty) make that pretty clear.

It’s worth noting that those who are familiar with Peter’s story will pick up on the implications right away. But a younger reader might not know what is about to happen and thus really enjoy the surprises that certainly await. It’s a nice balance, creating something nostalgic for some fans to read into while setting up surprises for a new audience.

Overall, Spider-Man #1 is proving to be the start of a fun and light series. While it may get darker at times, I doubt it will ever reach the heaviness that Parker’s series is sometimes known for (still miss you, Uncle Ben).

The Art

Marvel Action: Spider-Man #1 had a full team of artists helping to bring Peter’s latest adventure to life. Philip Murphy (art), Maria Keane (inks), Ronda Pattison (colors), Shawn Lee (letters) were all involved in this project.

Much like the story itself, this issue is full of a lighter style of artwork – one that almost feels bubbly at times. Peter’s proportions are played with from time to time, but it actually enhances the feeling that he’s constantly in motion.

Admittedly, the fight scenes in this issue are a lot more fun than usual, but for a different reason. The villains (by villains, I mean thugs – not proper antagonists) are goofy and heavily stylized in their wardrobes. It’s entertaining and adds a bit of levity to the situation.

This series’s reactions are over-the-top and humorous, making it pretty clear who the intended audience is. Still, it adds a certain amount of charm to the series as a whole and makes Peter come off as being even more endearing.

Conclusion

Marvel Action: Spider-Man #1 is a fun, lighthearted, and entertaining introduction to this latest Marvel Action series. It’s perfect for fans of all ages, especially if they’re looking for something a little less gruesome. There’s no doubt that this series has charm, and it intends to use it to keep readers coming back.

Cat Wyatthttp://quirkycatsfatstacks.com
Cat Wyatt is an avid comic book fan. She loves comics - possibly too much, and will happily talk your ear off about everything she's reading. Though picking a favorite is a bit harder. She reads a little bit of everything and is always open to trying a new series.