Summary

Lumberjanes #71 is an issue full of endearing artwork and surprising revelations, combining to make for a memorable read.

REVIEW OVERVIEW

Writing/Story
Pencils/Inks
Coloring
Lettering
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The Expectations of the Past in LUMBERJANES #71

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LUMBERJANES #71, out this Wednesday from Boom! Studios merges the past with the present as it finally reveals the history of the beloved Lumberjanes camp. Fans who have been curious about its origins will not want to miss out on this tale.

The past and the present mirror one another on the cover of Lumberjanes #71.

***SPOILER WARNING***

It’s hard to believe that Lumberjanes has been running long enough to have earned 71 issues. And yet at the same time, it feels like it’s always been here for the fans. What is perhaps more surprising is that we’ve never learned the origin of the camp itself – until now.

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The camp we know has always been open, loving, and accepting. We’ve seen all sorts of campers find a home here, while also having the freedom to be who they are. But that wasn’t always the case, as the latest issues have been quick to show us.

Our fearless leader appears to be at some risk on this alternate cover of Lumberjanes #71.

The Plot

Lumberjanes #71 is a carefully woven story. One that bounces back and forth between the present and the past to make a very specific point. This is the origin story of the Lumberjanes – and it is a moment we’ve all been waiting for.

It’s so tempting and easy to assume that the Lumberjanes have always existed, or at least have always been in the form that we know and love. That is to say, it’s easy to assume that has always been a camp willing to accept its campers.

But as Shannon Watters and Kat Leyh have shown us here, that is not exactly the case. This campsite originally had a very different purpose. This revelation actually adds a whole new layer to the series and has quickly become a new emotional point worth discussing.

Jane’s tale is revealed through carefully used storytelling techniques. Fans get to learn about her through the Roanoke cabin, which is actually something we’re fairly used to at this point. Interestingly enough, there are a couple of subplots revolving around this one. This little extra touch adds so much complexity to the story and makes us even more eager to see more.

And suddenly we know what sort of life Jane has to come back to.

The Art

Lumberjanes #71 is full of charming and endearing artwork, as always. Kanesha C. Bryant and Julia Madrigal were the lead artists for this issue, with Maarta Laiho providing the colors, and Aubrey Aiese doing the lettering.

Together they’ve created an enchanting issue. It’s always easy to tell the difference between the two timelines, something that we always appreciate here. The color palette and clothing styles change significantly between one and the other (as do the characters themselves, obviously). This is a simple yet highly effective way of conveying such a change.

There are a lot of subtle moments worth appreciating in this issue. The backdrops, the glimpses into Jane’s journal, and the exaggerated expressions of our campers, just to name a few. That being said, there’s one panel with a very obvious reference (involving one infamous plant) that we’re still chuckling about. Be sure to take a look for yourself.

Apparently stockings take a higher priority than wounded ankles…

In Conclusion

Lumberjanes #71 is another highly entertaining issue in this sometimes chaotic series. The origin of the camp is not at all what we expected – it’s much more intriguing. The complexity and depth to this plot do the entire series justice.

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Cat Wyatthttp://quirkycatsfatstacks.com
Cat Wyatt is an avid comic book fan. She loves comics - possibly too much, and will happily talk your ear off about everything she's reading. Though picking a favorite is a bit harder. She reads a little bit of everything and is always open to trying a new series.
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