reflection

POST AMERICANA #1 is a post-societal tale for the ages.
Writing/Story
Pencils/Inks
Colors
Letters

Review: POST AMERICANA #1 Shows What A Post-Apocalyptic America Could Look Like

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An all new series arrives on the comic book scene in POST AMERICANA #1, hitting stores on Wednesday, December 16th. This story explores what a post-apocalyptic America would look like if the elite barred themselves off from the rest of country. But their machinations don’t stop there; the group has captured dissenting voices and forced them into forced labor. Is there anyone who can stand against them?

Story

The issue opens with a speech from the new leader of the former United States. His address speaks to a reinvigorated plan to reclaim the country as their own. Readers soon learn of a catastrophe that lead the elite of the world to craft a “Bubble” to both isolate themselves from the rest of the world and craft weapons to soon conquer it.

However, we find that a pair of dissenters are planning a massive breakout with other workers. With hopes of revolution the two seek out a new locale, which turns out to be Fresno, California. But unlike its real world counterpart, this community is virtually identical to any scene from post-apocalyptic film.

We’re introduced to a woman named Carolyn who recently showed up to the camp, a man name Mike from the revolution, a literal cannibal named Rudy, and a self-proclaimed hero named F.F. Each of these has their own unique personality that lends value to the story and pushes the narrative forward.

Steve Skroce’s script sets up this series to be one of the greats. The pacing is well done, from the time it takes for the revolutionary group to make their escape to their eventual arrival in the Fresno encampment. Readers get a good understanding of the characters Carolyn, Mike, and even the F.F. We’re excited to see who else is introduced in the subsequent issues.

Artwork

The illustrations in this issue were unique in their gory yet intriguing styles. Skroce’s penciling and ink work cast scenes full of blood, death, and destruction, right down to the exploding heads. Combined with Dave Stewart’s coloring, these images burst forth with bright reds, blues, and whites, which add to the comic’s overall theme. In addition, Fonografiks’s lettering does a brilliant job of placing word balloons so it frames the characters’ action.

Conclusion

POST AMERICANA #1 is a post-societal tale for the ages. We’re excited to see how the protagonists attempt to face this version of America.

Do you there is any hope for defeating this new “America?” Let us know in the comments below!

Corey Patterson
A comic book nerd and reviewer with a special interest in the underlying themes of superhero, sci-fi and fantasy stories. He enjoys writing for Monkeys Fighting Robots, Pop Culture and Theology and other publications.