Review: Avengers Vs. X-Men #1 – ‘Nuff Said

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Avengers Vs. X-Men #1
Writer:  Brian Michael Bendis
Art:  John Romita Jr. [Pencils], Scott Hanna [Inks], Laura Martin [Colors]

Review: Avengers Vs. X-Men #1 - 'Nuff Said 1After what has felt like an eternity of build-up (but was really more like just over six months), the event to end all Marvel events has finally arrived on shelves–but was all of the hype worth it?

So far, it’s a toss-up.

The premise, in case you’ve been living under a rock or reading some other company’s books, is that the Phoenix is coming to Earth and has chosen the would-be-mutant-messiah Hope Summers as its host.  Hey, she looks like Jean Grey, so who else is it gonna pick, right?  Anyhow, the Phoenix is a cosmic firebird that leaves devastation in its wake on a planetary scale wherever it goes in the Universe.  It chose Jean Grey as its host once and she almost destroyed Earth, but that’s “The Dark Phoenix” saga and you can read about that elsewhere.

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Avengers Vs. X-Men #1 opens with the Avengers hanging around Avengers Tower doing the sorts of things you’d expect powerful people in tights to do (but not those things, sicko!) when all of a sudden, the intergalactic superhero Nova conveniently crashlands in New York City after falling from space.  He warns the Avengers that “it’s coming,” and Iron Man deduces that he’s referring to the Phoenix.  He and Captain America then brief the President on the danger.

Meanwhile, Cyclops–who has known all along that the Phoenix was on its way back–is training Hope and trying to prepare her in the hope that she’ll be able to control its power when it does return.  This entire conflict centers around the Avengers’ belief that the Phoenix will use Hope Summers as its vessel to try to destroy the world again versus Scott’s belief that if Hope can somehow control the Phoenix’s power, then she can undo the “no more mutants” spell that Scarlet Witch decimated the mutant population with.

Scott believes that Hope is the savior of the mutant race, and he’ll stop at nothing to see her fulfill that destiny–perhaps to the point of taking things too far during his particularly ruthless training sessions.  During the time that has passed since he joined the X-Men, Magneto has pointed out that Scott is growing more and more like him than his mentor, Charles Xavier.  This trend continues here, as Magneto–watching the training from a distance–comments to Emma Frost regarding the difference between “taking it seriously” and “compulsion,” perhaps foreshadowing things to come.

Anyhow, Hope is finally pushed far enough and releases a flare of Phoenix-like energy strong enough that the Avengers notice it.  Traveling to Utopia to see about taking Hope into Avengers custody until the Phoenix situation is figured out, Captain America is greeted by a particularly hostile Cyclops.

Thus, the first shots in the battle are fired, so to speak.

Over all, this is a solid start to the event, but it is by no means perfect.  Despite being packed with action, the dialogue pulled me out of the story on a few occasions, most notably during the conversation Captain America has with Wolverine regarding the Phoenix.  Given Wolverine’s history with Jean Grey and how he felt about her, I have a hard time believing that he wouldn’t just refer to her by her first name.  Using her entire name felt a little unnatural, especially after the previous scene already established her history.

Aside from that, though, anything else I noticed here would just be nitpicking.  Bendis’ first chapter draws you in and gives new readers a primer on what’s going on, and the art here is phenomenal.  The facial expressions of everyone standing in the vicinity when the first blow of this battle is landed were perhaps the highlight of the entire issue.  Desperate times call for desperate measures, especially when your bluff is being called, and that panel alone sells that idea absolutely.

After event fatigue had fully set in following last year’s Fear Itself (which, no offense to Matt Fraction, fell short of expectations), I swore I’d never drop $3.99 an issue on another “event” book again.  Despite being highly skeptical of the idea of Avengers Vs. X-Men, I have to say I’m impressed so far and actually looking forward to where this goes from here.

STORY:  8/10
ART:  9.5/10 


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Roger Riddell
Essentially Peter Parker with all the charm of Wolverine, he's a DC-based B2B journalist who occasionally writes about music and pop culture in his free time. His love for comics, metal, and videogames has also landed him gigs writing for the A.V. Club, Comic Book Resources, and Louisville Magazine. Keep him away from the whiskey, and don't ask him how much he hates the Spider-Man movies unless you're ready to hear about his overarching plot for a six-film series that would put the Dark Knight trilogy to shame.

12 COMMENTS

  1. The artwork is mediocre at best. To say that the artwork is phenomenal insults everyone that has purchased the book. This is supposed to the Marvels epic story for 2012. In comparison to the artwork we see in dozens of books each month, the artwork in this book is amateurish, lackluster and does little to excite the reader. You lost all credibility when you gave the art of JRJ 9.5/10.

    • I agree with you. I’m not a fan of JRJR but it appears that many are. I will not name name but friends of mine that draw for Marvel and DC really like his work. Also, I have been too many convention from C2E2 to SDCC and JRJR always get a huge applause when mentioned. I don’t get it. I remember picking up Punisher: War Zone in the early 90’s and was confused at his style. Oh well, their is always another big crossover next year.

  2. The artwork is mediocre at best. To say that the artwork is phenomenal insults everyone that has purchased the book. This is supposed to the Marvels epic story for 2012. In comparison to the artwork we see in dozens of books each month, the artwork in this book is amateurish, lackluster and does little to excite the reader. You lost all credibility when you gave the art of JRJ 9.5/10.

    • I agree with you. I’m not a fan of JRJR but it appears that many are. I will not name name but friends of mine that draw for Marvel and DC really like his work. Also, I have been too many convention from C2E2 to SDCC and JRJR always get a huge applause when mentioned. I don’t get it. I remember picking up Punisher: War Zone in the early 90’s and was confused at his style. Oh well, their is always another big crossover next year.

  3. Say what you will, but I’ve been sold on JRJR since his Wolverine run with Millar, and I’m really glad they put him on this cause he did a great job!

  4. Say what you will, but I’ve been sold on JRJR since his Wolverine run with Millar, and I’m really glad they put him on this cause he did a great job!

  5. “the art here is phenomenal.”…Are you blind?LOL…this looks ok for a REALLY good high school student…actually, I take that back, I remember a few guys back in High School that would blow this “art” away. I’m so disappointed, JRjr was, at one time, much more competent.Now, the faces and hands are so out of proportion, the poses and bodies in general seem stiff and very amateur….and whats with all the lines on everyones face…oh ya, and last time I checked, Captain America had a chin, just sayin’

    • While I prefer the 80s JRJr, his more recent style has grown on me. I HATED his more recent art the first time I saw it in the Amazing Spider-Man “New Ways to Die” story, though. Honestly, this is a review. It’s subjective. Personally, I thought the facial expressions and body language sold the story a little more. I could care less for proportion as long as it’s not over-exaggerated to the point of being Liefeldian. As far as the “high school” remarks, I’ve seen high school kids that blow golden age Ditko away, too, but that doesn’t make his art suck.

  6. “the art here is phenomenal.”…Are you blind?LOL…this looks ok for a REALLY good high school student…actually, I take that back, I remember a few guys back in High School that would blow this “art” away. I’m so disappointed, JRjr was, at one time, much more competent.Now, the faces and hands are so out of proportion, the poses and bodies in general seem stiff and very amateur….and whats with all the lines on everyones face…oh ya, and last time I checked, Captain America had a chin, just sayin’

    • While I prefer the 80s JRJr, his more recent style has grown on me. I HATED his more recent art the first time I saw it in the Amazing Spider-Man “New Ways to Die” story, though. Honestly, this is a review. It’s subjective. Personally, I thought the facial expressions and body language sold the story a little more. I could care less for proportion as long as it’s not over-exaggerated to the point of being Liefeldian. As far as the “high school” remarks, I’ve seen high school kids that blow golden age Ditko away, too, but that doesn’t make his art suck.

Comments are closed.

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