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Get Lost in 70’s Grindhouse-Noir with a BLACKING OUT Playlist

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Writer Chip Mosher and artist Peter Krause’s Blacking Out is an original graphic novel available to be backed on Kickstarter, and Mosher came up with a playlist to enhance your reading experience!

BLACKING OUT follows a drunk ex-cop looking for redemption as he attempts to solve a murder during the Southern California fire season.

Comics industry veteran and writer Chip Mosher and legendary artist Peter Krause (The Power of Shazam!, Irredeemable) present BLACKING OUT, a 56-page graphic novel presented in a deluxe oversized hardcover in the European album tradition. BLACKING OUT also showcases the amazing talents of colorist Giulia Brusco (Scalped, Django Unchained), letterer Ed Dukeshire (Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Mighty Morphin Power Rangers), and designer Tom Muller (X-Men).

Blacking Out is as dark as the smoky California skies that fill its pages. And like smoke, this noir clings to you. Redemptive, surprising, & bleak.” – Brian Azzarello (100 Bullets, Moonshine)

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This graphic novel was crafted with music in mind, so Mosher put together an awesome playlist full of classic rock, jazz, and soul tracks to pull you into the pages. Here he lists out and explains his thoughts on each track:

It’s funny. When I wrote Blacking Out, I listened, almost exclusively to Interpol’s Antics on repeat. I’d start with track four or five, “Take Me On A Cruise” or “Slow Hands,” and then put the album on repeat. Antics has a real trance-like effect on me and it offered Neo-noir white noise that let me enter the world of Blacking Out.

But when I was thinking about a soundtrack for the comic, none of those songs seemed right. With what Pete did with the visuals, grounding the story in a ‘70s aesthetic, it was important to find stuff from that era, but that didn’t sound like it. I wanted to find obscure tracks that felt out of time and remained timeless.

“Maggie M’Gill,” The Doors
I love the opening bass on this track. The Doors recorded this song in an empty club right before they did a live show. Maggie M’Gill was one of their lesser tracks, but I think this bassy and jazz’ed up version elevates the song to the level it should be sonically and really sets the mood…it’s dirty. It’s a song that’s drunk on itself.

“Ladytron,” Roxy Music
I feel like when you hear this song from Roxy Music’s debut album, it’s like entering another world. It doesn’t feel like 1972, but also doesn’t feel like the musical future it predicts. It’s kind of the sonic equivalent of the 1939’s World’s Fair futuristic cars… I think of this as the song that Conrad is hearing when he enters the bar to get his swerve on.

“Coming Down Again,” The Rolling Stones
Great song off of a masterful Stones album. I was told by a friend who’s a Stones aficionado that Keith Richards doesn’t even remember recording this album. Think about this backing Conrad as he wakes up at Anita’s.

“I Got Nothin’,” Iggy Pop and James Williamson
Feels like Conrad’s theme song as he starts to investigate the case. Great song from the mid-‘70s that was frequently bootlegged, but not officially released until decades later.

“Sunshine of Your Love,” Ella Fitzgerald
I was at this Northern Soul club in Leeds with the Thought Bubble crew when this track hit the air. Holy shit. I love this song and this version by Ella Fitzgerald is amazing. It had to go in the Blacking Out playlist.

“The Seeker,” The Who
A bit on the nose regarding Conrad, but hey, sometimes you want a song that really tells you what the hell is going on…

As I ransack their homes
They want to shake my hand
Focused in on nowhere
Investigating miles
I’m a Seeker, I’m a really desperate man!

“A White Shade of Pale,” King Curtis
Another song that feels out of place in its era. King Curtis’s sax covers of any song are worth a listen, but I love this one and think it would be great background music on any scene.

“Kill City,” Iggy Pop and James Williamson
Another great post-Stooges composition by Iggy and James Williamson. Says it all. Feels like it could have come out last year—love the noir feel of this song. Conrad, Anita, Mattie, and Lund definitely live in Kill City.

“If There Is Something,” Roxy Music
I’m a huge Sisters of Mercy fan and their song “Some Kind of Stranger” is my favorite. I was struck when I heard this track about how much of the main melody of “Some Kind of Stranger” is taken from this Roxy Music track. In any case, as it pertains to Blacking Out, I think this song would be great on some of the later scenes with him and Anita. Maybe when they take the walk and talk…

“Achilles Last Stand,” Led Zeppelin
An unappreciated gem by Page, Plant, Jones, and Bonham. We’re ramping up here, getting ready to experience the big finale.

“In Every Dream A Heartache, Roxy Music
(Laughs) I’m not going to say much about these next three songs as anything I say would give it away… but …oh shit. It’s coming. Watch Out.

“Winter,” The Rolling Stones
Maybe some regrets. SPOILERS! We are going into the Wilderness here….

“Jump Into the Fire,” Harry Nilsson
Maybe… the end? Read and find out folks! (Tuning the bass mid-song is amazing.)

“Ghost Rider,” Suicide
This plays over the credits. The greatest song about a comic book character ever written. 1977. Can you believe it? Sounds amazing. It had to go over the credits. And fits a bit, but had to throw this in for fun. The Sisters of Mercy used to cover this track live… Yeah, I know. I love that stupid band. Shut up.

Listen to the playlist on Spotify here:

If this playlist hits your musical sweet spot and the preview piques your interest, be sure to back the Kickstarter here for your own copy of the oversize hardcover and extra perks like art cards and more!

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Justin Munday
Reader and hoarder of comics. Quietly sipping coffee, reading, and watching sci-fi in Knoxville, TN.