reflection

Take a look at the cover of the first issue of Buzzard, and you’ll know exactly what you’re about to read. It’s unapologetically British, with a punk rock flair and off-the-wall violence.
Writing
Art

Review: BUZZARD #1 Has A Punk Rock Flair & Off-The-Wall Violence

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Take a look at the cover of the first issue of Buzzard, and you’ll know exactly what you’re about to read. It’s unapologetically British, with a punk rock flair and off-the-wall violence.

Buzzard is created by Andrea Wolf, with art by Ezequiel Assis, cover art by Samuele Zardinoni, and cover graphics by Rob Jonesand. You can check out the second issue, which is currently funding on Kickstarter right here.

About the series:
Welcome to modern Britain: a lost land where folks look for meaning in bizarre places, with devastating results. CEOs double as vigilantes, bored millionaires role-play as neo-Nazis and jaded scientists toss ethics in the bin to chase massive leaps. All under the beady eyes of commoners too apathetic to give a damn. 

Erik Lincoln aka Buzzard, obnoxious high-schooler-by-day/bladed-armed-hitman-by-night, navigates this chaos better than anyone. Is he a daredevil with peanuts for brains? I mean, yeah. But though he toys with his own life, he’ll do anything to improve his sister’s.

This balls to the wall action-comedy delves with irony and gusto into the contradictions and challenges of today’s world, fueled by British humour and running on a manga edge.

Story

Without giving too much away, it takes a minute to get an idea of where the story is going in the first issue of Buzzard, pivoting to more hi-tech science fiction. That is hardly a criticism, because Wolf gives us plenty of time to get to know the titular character. Buzzard is a smug, verbose anti-hero who has a love for his country. What stands out in this book is the dialogue and captioned narration, as Wolf does a stellar job at keeping the language loose and raw. And it’s also funny. It really helps paint a picture of who Buzzard is and the world he is fighting his way through.

Art

Much like the writing, Assis’ artwork has an intense and unrestrained edge to it. The bone-cracking and blood splattering is in full effect in the first issue of Buzzard. The lack of color gives it this grungy, noir feel, which really helps in emphasizing the seedy underbelly of Britain showcased in the book.

Conclusion

You can support Wolf, Assis, and the whole Buzzard team by checking out the second issue on Kickstarter. You can also support the creative team by following them on Facebook.

Michael Frommhttps://www.michaelefromm.com/
Michael E. Fromm is an all-around scrivener, writing screenplays (short and feature), short stories, novels, poetry, blogs, articles, and press releases. Since first learning to hold a pen, he has done little but read, watch, and write about characters and worlds of fantasy. It would be very difficult to find him without a pen in hand and an idea in mind, which is problematic for anyone wanting to have a conversation with him. Michael graduated from Rowan University, primarily focusing on improving his skills as a filmmaker and screenwriter. After said schooling, he joined an elite force of Rowan grads who also had the notion of becoming filmmakers. This group, known as Justice Productions, call on him every so often to write short films. And, until this whole writing thing pays off, Michael currently does development & marketing communication (writing, graphic & publication design, social media and website upkeep, etc.) for a web development company in Central New Jersey, where he currently resides.