reflection

Power Rangers #4 features great writing and art that focuses on character development. The issue's strengths in character outshine its weaknesses in regards to setting and action.
Writing/Story
Pencils/Inks
Coloring
Lettering

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Review: POWER RANGERS #4 — Do I Feel Bad For Lord Drakkon?

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GET YOUR COPY OF MFR: THE MAGAZINE #3

Power Rangers #4 was released February 17, 2021 by BOOM! Studios. The issue is written by Mighty Morphin Power Rangers head writer Ryan Parrot. Francesco Mortarino is the illustrator, Raũl Angulo provides the colors, and Ed Dukeshire letters the comic.

Story

Power Rangers affords Parrot a luxury its sister series, Mighty Morphin, does not. Since the work is less rooted in the original show and has a substantially smaller cast, the writer gets a chance to flesh out these characters. In this comic, we see Parrot shine as he gets to humanize Lord Drakkon. This is executed quite well and brings the reader on a journey similar to the other members of the cast. Should we trust Lord Drakkon? Do we feel empathy for what he has endured? Is there more to him than just an evil being hell-bent on reaching the ultimate power?

These are all questions Zach, Jason, and Trini ask in this issue, and due to Parrot’s superior writing, we the readers are drawn into the same mindset. This issue does feel a little light on action, however, but since we have some really great character-building, it does not feel like a let down.

Art

The way Mortarino captures faces on the Rangers is amazing. Their movements are fluid and the models convey a real sense of emotion and heart. The scenery leaves a little bit to be desired, though. The issue is set on a desolate prison world, but it feels a little generic. There is nothing in the background that jumps out and grabs you. Since this is a space opera, the reader should have a little more desire to look around and explore the panels, but the world feels flat and boring. Even when there are giant monsters roaming around, the setting may leave you wanting more.

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Coloring

Raũl Angulo’s coloring has the same problems that Mortarino’s art does. While the Rangers, Lord Drakkon, and the celestial beings are brilliantly colored, the world just isn’t satisfying to look at. These characters jump off the page and draw you into their setting. Once you get there, though, it is a bit boring and flat to look at. The world we are in in this issue is in ruins, but it just feels like flat concrete on a gray background. The colors thrive when they are illuminating living things, but they make the setting feel bland.

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Lettering

Ed Dukeshire pulls double duty on the MMPR line and letters both books. Power Rangers #4 is an issue where he gets to truly shine. The letters do not enhance the main cast, but they help set a mood of foreboding and doom that the setting fails to establish. When we see how Dukeshire voices some of Drakkon’s creations, they are able to show us how bleak and lonely Drakkon actually has been. The lettering he provides for the onomatopoeia really grabs you and fills you with a sense of excitement in the little bit of action the book provides. Ed Dukeshire has been a good and consistent letterer on Power Rangers, and this is an issue where he really shines.

Conclusion

Power Rangers #4 is a good and solid comic. I continue to be impressed with the quality of storytelling BOOM! lends to this family of titles. While this issue is light on action, it never feels like a let down. Lord Drakkon shines and feels like a deeper character. I was disappointed when the issue ended, and that’s not a bad thing. I want more, and I am impatient to have to wait a whole month for the next installment.

Jonathan Brown
Jonathan Brown
Jonathan Brown holds a MA in Religious Studies from the University of Georgia, and a MDiv from Emory University. His passions include video games, comics, and is a huge Power Rangers fan. He has published articles in Back Issue Magazine. The International Journal of Comic Art, the Jack Kirby Collector, and The Minas Tirith Evening Star. He is a frequent contributor to the "It's Dangerous to Go Alone Podcast" on the Move Over Kids Youtube Channel. He has is own YouTube Channel, Bandana Gamer. He lives in Washington, DC with his wife, 3 cats, and 2 dogs.