Review: MEOUCH #1 Is Deadpool Meets Rocket Raccoon

FIRST IMPRESSION

It’s a fun, bloody book for anyone who enjoys animal puns and anthropomorphic assassins.
Writing/Story
Pencils/Ink
Colors
Lettering
- Advertisement -

Take the cartoony style and unapologetic violence of I Hate Fairyland, add a main character that’s one part Garfield the Cat and two parts Rocket Raccoon, throw in some satirical references to The Punisher and Daredevil, and you’ve got the dark, brutal world of Meouch.

**Some Spoilers Below**

Meouch #1 Artwork

Story:

Drawing inspiration from Deadpool, Rocket Raccoon, and the work of Skottie Young, Meouch is an action-comedy comic featuring a gun-toting, pun-cracking assassin cat named Frankie. In the series’ first issue, Frankie is up against a deadly litter of killer cats known as the Nine Lives, whose handy work is getting in the way of his business.

Writing

- Advertisement -

Written by Paul Carroll, Meouch is a well-structured foray into this world. Readers are quickly given a sense of the gritty, neo-noir tone with introductory captions and enough blood, decapitations, and brain matter splattered throughout the book. Frankie is immediately established as a vulgar (those “fluffling” puns aren’t fooling anyone) and no-holds-barred feline with a enough of an interesting motivation to want to follow him into the underbelly of his world.

Meouch is fairly light on word count, leaving more room for the bloody action sequences in the panels. Overall, Carroll delivers a fun read that doesn’t take itself seriously whatsoever, except with its silly puns and spoof-y references.     

Art:

Gareth Luby’s illustrations bring the words and action of Meouch to life with a curvy, cartoony style akin to Garfield and Tom and Jerry. The blood splatter and brain matter is not off-putting. It also doesn’t leave much to the imagination.

The colors of Joe Griffin only enhance the R-rated Saturday morning cartoon style presented in Meouch. Most notable is his use of dark pink coloring of blood. It looks more like a can of jelly that exploded instead of someone getting a bullet to the head.

Hassan Otsmane-Elhaou’s letters are a nice contrast to the big and animated illustrations. They are jagged, looking as if they have been etched into the pages with a small knife.

Conclusion:

Meouch #1 is a fun read. It packs the high-brow humor from the cartoons of yesteryear and adds a heaping scoop of blood and guns. If you enjoy Rocket Raccoon, Deadpool, The Punisher, or Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, do yourself a favor and pick up a copy.

Check out the first few pages of Meouch #1 which is is set to launch at Dublin Comic Con this weekend:

Meouch #1 Page 1Meouch #1 Page 2Meouch #1 Page 3Meouch #1 Page 4

TRENDING THIS WEEK

Review: Eddie Brock Can’t Run From His Past In VENOM #16

Eddie Brock's ghosts continue to haunt him in Venom #16.

Review: STAR WARS: AGE OF RESISTANCE: CAPTAIN PHASMA #1- A Galaxy Far Less Interesting

It’s hard not to feel sympathy for the character Captain Phasma. Not that she was dealt a particularly difficult lot in life, but the...

The Joker Gets Two New Comics In October

Fans of DC's Clown Prince of Crime got some big news this week: two new Joker projects are hitting the stands this October (joining...

Exclusive Marvel Comics Preview: SILVER SURFER BLACK #2 (OF 5)

Silver Surfer Black #2 hits your local comic book store on July 17, but thanks to Marvel Comics, Monkeys Fighting Robots has a five-page...

Review: Building Glorious, Emotional Connections In Orphan Age #4

Orphan Age from AfterShock Comics is a modern day western centered on building characters and creating emotional attachments to it's diverse cast.

Review: SUPERGIRL #32 Dispensing Intergalactic Justice

Supergirl #32 is an adventurous battle sequence that is beautifully paced and packed with witty banter. It is a step up from the standard superhero punch up.

Review: SUPERMAN #13 Takes Us Into Jor-El’s Past

Brian Michael Bendis continues retelling the events of Jor-El's shady past in the seventh installment to The Unity Saga: House of El storyline. In...

STAR WARS #68: New Creative Team Provides Fresh Start

Writer Greg Pak and artist Phil Noto take over as the new creative team in STAR WARS #68.
Avatar
Michael Frommhttps://www.michaelefromm.com/
Michael E. Fromm is an all-around scrivener, writing screenplays (short and feature), short stories, novels, poetry, blogs, articles, and press releases. Since first learning to hold a pen, he has done little but read, watch, and write about characters and worlds of fantasy. It would be very difficult to find him without a pen in hand and an idea in mind, which is problematic for anyone wanting to have a conversation with him. Michael graduated from Rowan University, primarily focusing on improving his skills as a filmmaker and screenwriter. After said schooling, he joined an elite force of Rowan grads who also had the notion of becoming filmmakers. This group, known as Justice Productions, call on him every so often to write short films. And, until this whole writing thing pays off, Michael currently does development & marketing communication (writing, graphic & publication design, social media and website upkeep, etc.) for a web development company in Central New Jersey, where he currently resides.
COMIC REVIEW DIGEST, sign up today! At Monkeys Fighting Robots, we strive to talk about ALL aspects of a comic book, instead of just giving you a recap of the story.
  • Did you notice how epic the colors were?
  • That was a wicked panel layout by the artist!
  • What was the letterer thinking?
  • How did this comic book make you feel?
  • Most importantly, should you buy it?

Every Wednesday you will receive an email with our latest reviews and analyses, as well as our original comic strips and exclusive editorial content.
Thanks for signing up!