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The newest drop from Oats Studios is out now, and it’s almost as disturbing as what came before it. Rakka was disturbing because it portrayed a world that could exist in the near future; Cooking with Bill is disturbing because it portrays a commercial world we live in right now.

Oats Studios: Cooking With Bill 1

Tim Heidecker and Eric Wareheim made a name for themselves in the world of comedy by producing, short, 1980’s inspired, scratched VHS tape videos that are often times hard to look at. And harder to think about. But the comedy elements in Tim and Eric Awesome Show, Great Job! make their style obscure (at least at one point in time in 2007), subversive, and surrealistic.

Just Give The Man An Alien Already

The latest from Oats Studios has borrowed a thing or two from Tim and Eric, but the key humor element is missing. Leaving us with nothing more than a disturbing short, different than what should be expected from Neill Blomkamp. It turns out that this is a very good thing.

The newest short is an infomercial about a new nightmarish kitchen appliance that cuts food faster than any of its competitors. I don’t want to spoil anything, but the host ends up mangling himself pretty bad. You knew it was coming from underlying sense of dread preceding the incident.

Enjoy!

[embedyt] https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zaeFgSR_DMU[/embedyt]

We Can All Stop Pretending Alien: Covenant Was Good

This is fascinating because it’s unexpected, and showcases the versatility of what Oats Studios is trying to accomplish. On their website, right next to their logo, their mission statements reads, “we make experimental short films.” And now it’s solidified. The audience was expecting Rakka: Part Two, but we got something else entirely. What we got was oddly organic satire. If really, really dark comedy is within the grand scheme of Oats Studios, I will throw money at them forever.

“Experimental” is the word to focus on. Assumedly, “science fiction” would be what you expected, but the audience is learning that “expected” is not a word to associate with Neill Blomkamp or anything he touches.

Blomkamp is becoming a twisted, Midas obsessed, little ringmaster at The Sci-fi Show of Horrors, and if Oats Studios is his mystery box, then I look forward to the next atrocious surprise.